Why Use Grapes For Wine?

Have you ever wondered why grapes are used to make wine? Why not strawberries or blackberries? At least, why not more of those types of wine? I had this same question recently, so I decided to do a little research. Here’s what I’ve found:

To keep it simple grapes have the perfect balance of tannins, sugars, and acids to create wine. This is exactly the reason why there are “table grapes” and “wine grapes” as well. Grapes used for wine are sweeter (needed to convert the sugar into alcohol), have thicker skins (better for wines, especially ride wine for the tannins and color), are smaller (concentrated flavors), and come from the species Vitis Vinifera (a species from the Mediterranean which all wines come from). So naturally, table grapes, have less sugar, thinner skins, are usually bigger in size, and come from the species Vitis Labrusca or Vitis Rotundifolia.

But again, why not strawberries? Technically, you can make wine out of any fruit. Juice it, add sugar if needed, ferment, bam. Wine. Really it’s just that through history people have grown, no pun intended, to love grapes for wine. They already have the perfect combinations of sugar and tannins, as we’ve discovered, to make a really nice wine. Strawberries have a higher water content, they lack tannins, so yes you can and people do make wine with them, it’s just not as common because you’ll have a few extra steps, and the outcome won’t be quite the same wine you’re expecting.

Have ya’ll tried any different fruity wines? Strawberry? Blackberry? Pineapple? Let me know in the comments below!

 

 

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